skip to primary navigationskip to content

Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology

Studying at Cambridge

Jobs and studentships

MPhil Studentship: Modelling of Upstream Processing in Cell Cultures

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Apr 26, 2017.

A fully-funded 1-year MPhil Studentship supervised by Prof Nigel Slater and Dr Duygu Dikicioglu is available at the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology within the framework of MedImmune Beacon Project. The studentship has a start date of October 2017.

The research will involve a model-based analysis of upstream processing in mammalian cell cultures producing monoclonal antibodies. Controlled cultivations are used to generate realistic, scalable, and repeatable process conditions in bioprocesses by monitoring control parameters and outputs. Consequently, a wealth of data on process attributes is available for each bioprocess. Although such data are generally considered to be vital from a Process Analytical Technology perspective, the information embedded in these datasets is often not fully exploited and only archived. In this research project, the successful applicant will mine and compile such data from cultures of recombinant protein production by Chinese hamster ovary cells, and employ model-based approaches to detect and identify general patterns in this data set. The candidate will identify cultivation parameters that are representative of the performance and the course of cultivations, and that may be used in the predictive control of future cultivations.

Applicants should have (or expect to be awarded) an upper second or first class UK honours degree at the level of BSc, BEng (or overseas equivalents) in a relevant subject. The ideal candidate should be familiar with basic concepts of modelling and in silico analysis of biological systems. The candidate should also be familiar with the basics of cell cultivation and recombinant protein production, at least theoretically.

Informal enquiries may be made to Dr Duygu Dikicioglu by email on dd345@cam.ac.uk.

To apply for this position, please send the following to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on Monday 26th May 2017:

1) Include the vacancy reference number, NQ12053, in the subject line of your email 2) A detailed curriculum vitae 3) Transcripts and/or degree certificates that include numerical details of grades obtained in relevant examinations/courses. 4) Contact details (email addresses) for two academic referees

Please quote reference NQ12053 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Analysis and quantitative evaluation of functionalised nanoscale silica

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 27, 2017.

Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

A fully funded 3.5 year iCASE studentship is available to work with Dr Mick Mantle (Department of Chemical Engineering & Biotechnology, University of Cambridge) and Dr Alan Taylor (Industrial supervisor, The Welding Institute (TWI), Granta Park Cambridge)) .The project will start 1 October 2017. The aim of this Ph.D. is to investigate and develop analytical methods for the quantified characterisation of novel functionalised nanoscale oxides with a specific focus on silica. Such materials represent potential novel additives for emerging metamaterials such as self-renewing, erosion resistant and anti-icing composite materials for use in extreme environments (high erosion and very low temperature). Potential end user applications are numerous and include wind turbine blades, aircraft and rotorcraft leading edges, automotive components and cryogenic storage tanks for space applications.

The objectives of the PhD are the following:

  • To synthetize and characterise functional additives according to design rules established by TWI and in accordance with TWI background IP. These additives will include oxide (silica) nanoparticles that are functionalised with at least one type of ligand and which may possess structural hierarchies that are able to confer hydrophobicity and erosion resistance to a bulk resin without adversely affecting the intrinsic properties of the bulk whilst bringing about a step change in the efficacy of the performance of the composites made with these resins.

Silica nano-particles in different sizes will be synthetized via the well-known sol-gel technique Stoeber process. The range of diameters of the spheres produced will vary and a combination of sizes to form the so-called 'raspberry-like-structures' will be also investigated. They will be characterised using a range of methods but particularly 1H, 13C & 29Si Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR and NMR relaxometry will be used to determine both intra- and extra- particle (surface) functionalisation. In addition pulsed field gradient diffusion NMR will be used to examine particle aggregation and particle internal mass transport properties. Other analytical methods that are expected to be used include TGA to determine particle thermal properties and SEM to determine the morphology of the particles. Particles of different sizes and clusters in a determined manner will be exposed to a surface treatment that will allow the functionalisation of each of the particles with a determined functional group to provide hydrophobicity and compatibility with the matrix. They will also be characterised via DLS to evaluate the particle size distribution.

A further aspect will be to incorporate and disperse these additives into model resin systems and to undertake characterisation which includes: evaluation and definition of a suitable method and steps in order to incorporate nano-additives into resins; investigation and identification of the suitable dispersing technology (e.g. ultrasound homogeniser, 3-roll-mill, high pressure homogeniser, beads mill); Investigation of the influence of the nanostructured additives and their dispersion quality (e. g. viscosity/loading profile, curing behaviour, stability and re-agglomeration). Characterisation will include: initial and early characterisation of the modified resin: thermal properties (TGA and DSC, mechanical properties (Taber abrasion), repellency properties (surface energy and roll-off angles); Characterisation of the dispersions via spectroscopy (IR, NMR, Raman, UV - Chemical titration); microscopy (TEM, SEM, AFM, OM, fluorescence); and study of the influence of particles on network formation with methods such as chemorheology, DSC, IR TF.

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics.

Please note that whilst this project is based in Cambridge the student will be expected to spend considerable time working at TWI in Granta Park.

To apply for this position, please send the following to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on Friday 12th May 2017:

1) Include the vacancy reference number, NQ11802, in the subject line of your email 2) A detailed curriculum vitae, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations

Please quote reference NQ11802 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Developing a Novel Magnetic Resonance Method to Characterise Molecular Dynamics inside Catalysts

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

(4-year fully-funded EPSRC industrial CASE studentship with Professor Lynn Gladden, Dr. Andy York and Dr. Mick Mantle; industrial partner Johnson Matthey plc (www.matthey.com). Project to start 1 October 2017.)

Catalysis lies at the heart of the chemical industry with 80% of industrial chemical production requiring catalytic technology within their manufacturing process. It is estimated that catalysis contributes around $10 trillion to the global economy, including £50 billion p.a. to the UK alone. As a result there is strong motivation to make catalytic processes more energy efficient, and more selective to the required product thereby reducing production of by-products or waste streams. Our research group has already developed a range of techniques, many based on magnetic resonance methods, to probe molecular adsorption and diffusion in porous catalysts. This CASE studentship is focussed on extending the use of fast-field cycling NMR (a multi-frequency NMR technique) to characterise molecular dynamics and molecule-surface interactions inside catalysts, and to develop its use alongside techniques we have already established in the group. Understanding how reactants, intermediates and product molecules interact with each other inside the pores of a catalyst as well as with the pore surface and the catalytically active site is central to advances in catalyst design. Once the method is sufficiently developed, it will be applied to a range of catalytic materials to explore the extent to which the new insights obtained may be used to improve process performance.

The industrial collaborator on the project is Johnson Matthey (www.matthey.com), one of the largest catalyst manufacturers in the world. This partnership gives us access to catalytic materials and insight to the relevant process technologies so that whilst doing fundamental research, the outputs of the project can be applied to relevant industrial systems.

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics.

To apply for the studentship:

  1. Include the Vacancy Reference number LFGPHD002A in the subject line of your email.

  2. Send your CV, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations, to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on 19 May 2017.

Please quote reference LFGPHD002A on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Fast Field Cycling NMR Studies of Porous Materials

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

Fully-funded 3-year PhD studentship with Professor Lynn Gladden, Dr. Andy Sederman and Dr. Mick Mantle. To start 1 October 2017. Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

The aim of this project is to develop and explore the use of Fast Field Cycling NMR to advance our understanding of porous materials. In conventional NMR experiments we perform experiments at a fixed magnetic field; such measurements can be used to characterise pore size and adsorption of molecules within those pores. There is increasing interest in exploring how new insights into the dynamics of molecules in porous materials might be obtained by being able to perform NMR relaxation time measurements over a very large number of magnetic field strengths within the same experiment. The experimental method to do this is called Fast Field Cycling NMR.

The student undertaking this project should be motivated to learn and understand the basic physics and chemistry of NMR relaxation time measurements and the FFC experiment, as well as the physics and chemistry related to the materials that we will study. Areas of application that we will explore are:

Heterogeneous catalysis: To what extent can we characterise the dynamics of molecules at the surface of catalysts and the adsorption interaction of those molecules with the surface? Multi-component, multi-phase behaviour in rock cores: How do different molecules adsorb and diffuse through porous rocks? How do these properties depend on the surface chemistry and pore size of the rock? This is relevant to CO2 sequestration, ground water remediation and hydrocarbon recovery. Controlled release pharmaceutical delivery: In many of these systems a pharmaceutically active agent is released through a polymer or powder matrix. Under certain condition of, for example, pH body fluids penetrate the matrix causing it to swell thereby enabling the release of the active agent. How might the matrix be optimised to undergo the required phase change (and associated change in porosity) so as to optimise the release of the active?

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics.

Informal enquires may be directed to either Dr Mick Mantle (mdm20@cam.ac.uk) or Dr Andy Sederman (ajs40@cam.ac.uk). Please do not send applications to Drs. Mantle or Sederman.

To apply for the studentship:

  1. Include the Vacancy Reference number LFGPHD005A in the subject line of your email.

  2. Send your CV, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations, to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on 19 May 2017.

Please quote reference LFGPHD005A on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Hydrodynamics in Multi-Phase Reactors

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

Fully-funded PhD studentship with Professor Lynn Gladden, Dr. Andrew Sederman and Dr. Mick Mantle. The studentship is funded by Shell. Project to start 1 October 2017. Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

The aim of this project is to develop and implement novel magnetic resonance techniques to image flow fields in catalytic reactors. The group is established as a leader in imaging fluid flows in fixed-bed reactors and we have a number of projects extending this to spatially-resolving catalytic conversion inside such reactors. This project will study flow through fixed beds of catalyst particles and will focus on reactor systems that will change with time; that is, the internal structure of the reactor will change as the catalytic reaction proceeds. There is scope to develop new ultra-fast flow imaging techniques as well as to apply these methods to problems of both fundamental research significance and industrial relevance.

Initially there will be two areas of application: (i) How do particulates that break off from catalyst pellets during use ('fines') redistribute within the bed and modify the fluid flow fields with the reactor? How does this influence reactor operation? (ii) The use of biological materials as a chemical feedstock is an area of significant interest. However, as the biological materials inside a reactor chemical transform, how do the transport processes (i.e. molecular diffusion and flow) change? We need to understand fluid hydrodynamics within these systems if such 'green' chemical processes are to be widely adopted in the chemical and process industries.

The project is based in Cambridge but the student will have the opportunity to interact with collaborators in Shell.

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics.

To apply for the studentship:

  1. Include the Vacancy Reference number LFGPHD006A in the subject line of your email.

  2. Send your CV, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations, to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on 19 May 2017.

Please quote reference LFGPHD006A on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Multi-Phase Flows in Porous Media

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

(3-year fully-funded PhD studentship with Professor Lynn Gladden, Dr. Andrew Sederman and Dr. Mick Mantle. The studentship is funded by Shell. Project to start 1 October 2017.) Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

The need to improve our understanding of multi-component systems of liquids and gases moving within porous structures is of widespread importance in the chemical and process industries. The motivation for this project is to advance the application of magnetic resonance techniques to study multi-phase flows in rock cores with the aim of understanding the mechanism by which injection fluids displace oil from the pore structure of the rock. If this can be done more efficiently, fewer bore holes need be drilled and significantly more oil recovered from existing wells. Magnetic resonance techniques are uniquely placed to address this research challenge because they can acquire data from within optically opaque materials and provide quantitative data on fluid flow behaviour that can be made specific to different chemical species. In the Magnetic Resonance Research Centre we are able to apply these methods to rock cores under conditions of temperatures and pressure relevant to the oil field. The aims of this project are:

(i) To spatially resolve chemically-specific measurements of oil and water diffusion and flow within rocks (ii) To increase the spatial resolution of these measurements by at least an order of magnitude relative to that which is currently possible (iii) Apply these methods to real fluid-rock systems to gain an improved understanding of oil displacement processes in rocks.

The project is based in Cambridge but the student will have the opportunity to interact with collaborators in Shell and Imperial College, London.

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics.

To apply for the studentship:

  1. Include the Vacancy Reference number LFGPHD001A in the subject line of your email.

  2. Send your CV, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations, to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on 19 May 2017.

Please quote reference LFGPHD001A on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: New Insights into the Rheology of Dense Particulate Systems: Understanding Micro-Scale Transport Phenomena in Industrially- Relevant Wet Particulate Systems using Magnetic Resonance

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

A 3-year fully-funded studentship is available to work with Professor Lynn Gladden and Dr. Andrew Sederman to investigate the properties and processing of high solids content structured liquids, slurries and pastes using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. As well as being a subject of much topical interest across mathematics, physics and chemical engineering, the rheology of dense particulate systems is of wide industrial relevance. In this project the main application of interest is the formulation, processing and characterisation of catalytic materials. The project is funded by Johnson Matthey plc (www.matthey.com), one of the largest catalyst manufacturers in the world.

Of particular relevance in this project will be investigating the movement of the liquid when the system is subject to different physical gradients, i.e. shear, pressure, and temperature. This is of paramount importance for the production of high quality, consistent products. Specific industrially-important applications will include: migration of the water phase in ceramic pastes during extrusion; thin film coating of slurries; drying of wet particulate structures; wetting behaviour of dry powders during the creation of slurry. It is expected that some NMR/MRI technique development will be required to allow investigation of these relatively fast processes.

This 3 year fully-funded PhD research project will employ a wide range of NMR and MRI experimental techniques. The project will involve NMR technique development, as well as experiments on both model and realistic conditions.

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics. The project will start on 1 October 2017.

Informal enquires may be directed to either Dr Andrew Sederman (ajs40@cam.ac.uk) or Dr Andy York (ayork@matthey.com). Please do not send applications to Drs. Sederman or York.

To apply for the studentship:

  1. Include the Vacancy Reference number LFGPHD004A in the subject line of your email.

  2. Send your CV, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations, to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on 19 May 2017.

Please quote reference LFGPHD004A on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Optimising the Surface Chemistry of Catalytic Materials

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

(4-year fully-funded EPSRC industrial CASE studentship with Professor Lynn Gladden and Dr. Mick Mantle; industrial partner BP plc. Project to start 1 October 2017.)

Heterogeneous catalysis lies at the heart of many catalytic processes, which contribute to an industrial sector worth £50 billion p.a. to the UK economy. During a heterogeneous catalytic processes, one or more of the reactant species must interact with the surface of the catalyst where reaction to products then occurs. The aim of this project is to learn how to modify the surface chemistry of, typically, oxide-based materials to optimise their adsorption properties for specific catalytic conversions. The project will introduce the student to a range of well-established catalyst characterisation techniques. However, the main focus of the project will be to extend our use of NMR nuclear spin relaxation time techniques to characterise molecule-surface interactions and, in particular, to study multi-component adsorption in both the gas and liquid phases. These experiments will be combined with NMR measurements of molecular diffusion, Thus we aim to measure how modifications to surface chemistry change the adsorption and molecular mobility within a catalyst. These methods are of particular interest because they can be performed under reaction conditions making the results of immediate relevance to real catalytic materials, including porous silicas and zeolites.

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics.

To apply for the studentship:

  1. Include the Vacancy Reference number LFGPHD003A in the subject line of your email.

  2. Send your CV, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations, to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on 19 May 2017.

Please quote reference LFGPHD003A on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Research Assistant/Associate (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 29, 2017.

A position is open for a Postdoctoral Research Assistant/Associate to work on process chromatography at the University of Cambridge, Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology. The project is sponsored by INVISTA's Biotechnology group based at Wilton, UK (http://www.invista.com/en/biotechnology/index.html) and the principal investigators are Prof. J. S. Dennis and Prof. N. K. H. Slater.

The research will focus on the evaluation at both pilot scale and bench scale of continuous ion exchange chromatography to remove particular products from process streams derived from a fermentation. Three important requirements for the successful candidate will be the ability (i) to configure, assemble, HAZOP and run a small, pilot-scale unit, (ii) to conduct carefully a range of experimental evaluations, underpinned by small-scale experiments in the laboratory, and (iii) to model ab initio, using for example MATLAB and Simulink, the functioning of the apparatus, embracing all relevant scales of the chromatographic operation.

Significant knowledge of chemical engineering, modelling, mass transfer and kinetics is essential. For appointment to Research Associate, applicants must have a PhD in a relevant area. Previous experience with chromatography would be an advantage, but not essential. The post-holder will be responsible for the initial construction of all apparatus and for the development of the relevant models.

The ability to work both as part of a team, and independently, coupled with excellent communication, organisational and problem-solving skills is required. The duties / responsibilities of this post include detailed liaison with our industrial partner, developing and shaping the research as results emerge, spending time at the company's premises to liaise with company researchers and conducting regular briefing sessions, as required. The ability to write up work carefully for presentation and publication is very important. The successful applicant will be supported strongly by both the industrial and academic partners in order to achieve effective outcomes.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 36 months in the first instance. Subject to business needs, INVISTA (in its sole discretion) may consider the Postdoctoral Research Associate/Assistant for employment at the end of this project.

Once an offer of employment has been accepted, the successful candidate will be required to undergo a health assessment.

This is a re-advertising of this post: previous applicants are requested not to re-apply.

For further information contact Prof John Dennis (jsd3@cam.ac.uk).

Deadline for applications Monday 8th May 2017

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Applicants should provide a CV, including contact details of three referees and a covering letter describing their suitability for the role.

Please quote reference NQ11111 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.