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Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology

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PhD UK/EU Studentship: Colloidosome Capsules for Medical Imaging and Targeted Drug Delivery

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 22, 2017.

A fully funded studentship is available at the University of Cambridge supervised by Dr Alex Routh from the Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology Department and Dr Ferdia Gallagher from the Department of Radiology. Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available for UK/EU students. We regret that individuals from non-EU countries are not eligible to apply for the studentship.

The aims of the project are 1) To develop aqueous core microcapsules to encapsulate therapeutic drugs as well as imaging contrast agents as a companion biomarker. 2) To develop capsules which are non-toxic and will pass across the endothelium of neovascularised tissue.

Colloidosomes are a type of microcapsule. We routinely make them around 1-2 microns in diameter with an aqueous core surrounded by a polymer shell. In recent years such structures have shown exciting new opportunities for developing advanced drug delivery systems, due to their high encapsulation efficacy and simple control of their size, permeability, mechanical strength, and compatibility.

An issue with polymeric shells is the inherent porosity, meaning small molecules will leak over extended timescales. We have proposed growing a second shell and demonstrated aqueous core colloidosomes, with a silver shell, sealing the core indefinitely. The work also demonstrated the use of ultrasound to break the metal coated capsules.

Here we propose to make capsules with a calcium carbonate shell and to use ultrasound to rupture the shell - ensuring an almost instantaneous release of the drug. In addition this project aims to investigate the use of these capsules as contrast agents for medical imaging - the capsules will be fluorescently labelled as a proof-of-principle, with the ultimate aim of radiolabelling the aqueous core for translation into patient.

We would also like to investigate these capsules for drug delivery, encapsulating pharmaceutical actives, delivering them to cells and then controlling the release.

There are four distinct parts of this project:

i. Development of 1-2 micron CaCO3 coated capsules ii. Fluorescently-labelled capsules as a proof-of-principle for an imaging biomarker iii. Develop methods to chelate the capsules to antibodies to demonstrate that these capsules can be specifically targeted. iv. Investigate different triggering mechanisms and the use of various actives.

For informal enquiries only, please contact Dr Alex Routh at afr10@cam.ac.uk.

To apply for this position, please send the following to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on Wednesday 26th April 2017:

1) Include the vacancy reference number, NQ11761, in the subject line of your email 2) A detailed curriculum vitae 3) Transcripts and/or degree certificates that include numerical details of grades obtained in relevant examinations/courses.

Please quote reference NQ11761 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Developing a Novel Magnetic Resonance Method to Characterise Molecular Dynamics inside Catalysts

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

(4-year fully-funded EPSRC industrial CASE studentship with Professor Lynn Gladden, Dr. Andy York and Dr. Mick Mantle; industrial partner Johnson Matthey plc (www.matthey.com). Project to start 1 October 2017.)

Catalysis lies at the heart of the chemical industry with 80% of industrial chemical production requiring catalytic technology within their manufacturing process. It is estimated that catalysis contributes around $10 trillion to the global economy, including £50 billion p.a. to the UK alone. As a result there is strong motivation to make catalytic processes more energy efficient, and more selective to the required product thereby reducing production of by-products or waste streams. Our research group has already developed a range of techniques, many based on magnetic resonance methods, to probe molecular adsorption and diffusion in porous catalysts. This CASE studentship is focussed on extending the use of fast-field cycling NMR (a multi-frequency NMR technique) to characterise molecular dynamics and molecule-surface interactions inside catalysts, and to develop its use alongside techniques we have already established in the group. Understanding how reactants, intermediates and product molecules interact with each other inside the pores of a catalyst as well as with the pore surface and the catalytically active site is central to advances in catalyst design. Once the method is sufficiently developed, it will be applied to a range of catalytic materials to explore the extent to which the new insights obtained may be used to improve process performance.

The industrial collaborator on the project is Johnson Matthey (www.matthey.com), one of the largest catalyst manufacturers in the world. This partnership gives us access to catalytic materials and insight to the relevant process technologies so that whilst doing fundamental research, the outputs of the project can be applied to relevant industrial systems.

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics.

To apply for the studentship:

  1. Include the Vacancy Reference number LFGPHD002A in the subject line of your email.

  2. Send your CV, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations, to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on 19 May 2017.

Please quote reference LFGPHD002A on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Exploring Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) Materials for Gas Adsorption and Separation Applications

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 16, 2017.

This is a 3-year PhD project studentship to start October 2017. We regret that we are unable to consider non-UK/non-EU citizens for this project. To determine if you are eligible, please visit:

http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

In addition, students would need to be eligible for 'Home Fees' according to the criteria at:

http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/costs/status.html Full details can be found here: http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/skills/students/help/eligibility/

We are currently recruiting an outstanding PhD candidate for investigating porous materials such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), porous organic polymers (POPs), Covalent Organic Frameworks (COFs) etc. capability for different gas storage and separation applications, under the supervision of Dr David Fairen-Jimenez and Dr Peyman Z. Moghadam. The project is a collaborative research between the Department of Chemical Engineering & Biotechnology (CEB), University of Cambridge, and the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC).

The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) ¿ run by the CCDC ¿ contains over 850,000 small molecule crystal structures, including tens of thousands of MOFs and their organic counterparts. The CSD is therefore a vital resource in identifying existing structures with promising characteristics for many applications. However, the large diversity in the composition of extended materials makes finding and extracting outstanding structures for potential gas storage and separation applications a challenging prospect.

The aim of this PhD project is to develop maintainable subsets of different classes of porous materials deposited in the CSD and utilize an array of computational tools to characterize their textural properties (e.g. surface area, void fraction, density etc.). The PhD candidate will then employ large scale high-throughput molecular-level calculations to probe the created subsets for different opportunities including gas storage, separation, capture of toxic chemicals as well as drug adsorption. Using such in-silico screenings of adsorbent materials, you will underpin the complex structure-property relationships for targeted applications and experimentally synthesize and test promising materials that emerge from the simulations.

Applicants should have (or expect to be awarded) a first class UK honours degree at the level of MSci, MEng (or overseas equivalents - please visit: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk//international-students/international-qualifications to determine if your final grade/mark equates to a UK First) in a relevant science subject (e.g. Chemical Engineering, Materials Science, Physics, Chemistry, etc.) and should meet the criteria for UK/EU residency.

Sponsor: Financial support for this project is provided by the European Research Council (ERC) and the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC). The funds for this post are available for 3 years in the first instance.

Informal enquiries may be made by email to Dr David Fairen-Jimenez (df334@cam.ac.uk) or Dr Peyman Z. Moghadam (pzm20@cam.ac.uk)

The successful candidate will be expected to formally apply for admission as a PhD student and meet any conditions of admission set by the University. More information can be found at: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/

To apply for this position, please send the following to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on Monday 17th April 2017:

1) Include the vacancy reference number, NQ11716 in the subject line of your email 2) A detailed curriculum vitae 3) Transcripts and/or degree certificates that include numerical details of grades obtained in relevant examinations/courses.

Please quote reference NQ11716 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Fast Field Cycling NMR Studies of Porous Materials

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

Fully-funded 3-year PhD studentship with Professor Lynn Gladden, Dr. Andy Sederman and Dr. Mick Mantle. To start 1 October 2017. Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

The aim of this project is to develop and explore the use of Fast Field Cycling NMR to advance our understanding of porous materials. In conventional NMR experiments we perform experiments at a fixed magnetic field; such measurements can be used to characterise pore size and adsorption of molecules within those pores. There is increasing interest in exploring how new insights into the dynamics of molecules in porous materials might be obtained by being able to perform NMR relaxation time measurements over a very large number of magnetic field strengths within the same experiment. The experimental method to do this is called Fast Field Cycling NMR.

The student undertaking this project should be motivated to learn and understand the basic physics and chemistry of NMR relaxation time measurements and the FFC experiment, as well as the physics and chemistry related to the materials that we will study. Areas of application that we will explore are:

Heterogeneous catalysis: To what extent can we characterise the dynamics of molecules at the surface of catalysts and the adsorption interaction of those molecules with the surface? Multi-component, multi-phase behaviour in rock cores: How do different molecules adsorb and diffuse through porous rocks? How do these properties depend on the surface chemistry and pore size of the rock? This is relevant to CO2 sequestration, ground water remediation and hydrocarbon recovery. Controlled release pharmaceutical delivery: In many of these systems a pharmaceutically active agent is released through a polymer or powder matrix. Under certain condition of, for example, pH body fluids penetrate the matrix causing it to swell thereby enabling the release of the active agent. How might the matrix be optimised to undergo the required phase change (and associated change in porosity) so as to optimise the release of the active?

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics.

Informal enquires may be directed to either Dr Mick Mantle (mdm20@cam.ac.uk) or Dr Andy Sederman (ajs40@cam.ac.uk). Please do not send applications to Drs. Mantle or Sederman.

To apply for the studentship:

  1. Include the Vacancy Reference number LFGPHD005A in the subject line of your email.

  2. Send your CV, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations, to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on 19 May 2017.

Please quote reference LFGPHD005A on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Hydrodynamics in Multi-Phase Reactors

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

Fully-funded PhD studentship with Professor Lynn Gladden, Dr. Andrew Sederman and Dr. Mick Mantle. The studentship is funded by Shell. Project to start 1 October 2017. Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

The aim of this project is to develop and implement novel magnetic resonance techniques to image flow fields in catalytic reactors. The group is established as a leader in imaging fluid flows in fixed-bed reactors and we have a number of projects extending this to spatially-resolving catalytic conversion inside such reactors. This project will study flow through fixed beds of catalyst particles and will focus on reactor systems that will change with time; that is, the internal structure of the reactor will change as the catalytic reaction proceeds. There is scope to develop new ultra-fast flow imaging techniques as well as to apply these methods to problems of both fundamental research significance and industrial relevance.

Initially there will be two areas of application: (i) How do particulates that break off from catalyst pellets during use ('fines') redistribute within the bed and modify the fluid flow fields with the reactor? How does this influence reactor operation? (ii) The use of biological materials as a chemical feedstock is an area of significant interest. However, as the biological materials inside a reactor chemical transform, how do the transport processes (i.e. molecular diffusion and flow) change? We need to understand fluid hydrodynamics within these systems if such 'green' chemical processes are to be widely adopted in the chemical and process industries.

The project is based in Cambridge but the student will have the opportunity to interact with collaborators in Shell.

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics.

To apply for the studentship:

  1. Include the Vacancy Reference number LFGPHD006A in the subject line of your email.

  2. Send your CV, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations, to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on 19 May 2017.

Please quote reference LFGPHD006A on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Multi-Phase Flows in Porous Media

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

(3-year fully-funded PhD studentship with Professor Lynn Gladden, Dr. Andrew Sederman and Dr. Mick Mantle. The studentship is funded by Shell. Project to start 1 October 2017.) Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

The need to improve our understanding of multi-component systems of liquids and gases moving within porous structures is of widespread importance in the chemical and process industries. The motivation for this project is to advance the application of magnetic resonance techniques to study multi-phase flows in rock cores with the aim of understanding the mechanism by which injection fluids displace oil from the pore structure of the rock. If this can be done more efficiently, fewer bore holes need be drilled and significantly more oil recovered from existing wells. Magnetic resonance techniques are uniquely placed to address this research challenge because they can acquire data from within optically opaque materials and provide quantitative data on fluid flow behaviour that can be made specific to different chemical species. In the Magnetic Resonance Research Centre we are able to apply these methods to rock cores under conditions of temperatures and pressure relevant to the oil field. The aims of this project are:

(i) To spatially resolve chemically-specific measurements of oil and water diffusion and flow within rocks (ii) To increase the spatial resolution of these measurements by at least an order of magnitude relative to that which is currently possible (iii) Apply these methods to real fluid-rock systems to gain an improved understanding of oil displacement processes in rocks.

The project is based in Cambridge but the student will have the opportunity to interact with collaborators in Shell and Imperial College, London.

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics.

To apply for the studentship:

  1. Include the Vacancy Reference number LFGPHD001A in the subject line of your email.

  2. Send your CV, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations, to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on 19 May 2017.

Please quote reference LFGPHD001A on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Metal-Organic Framework Adsorbents for Gas Adsorption

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 16, 2017.

This is a 4-year PhD project studentship funded by an Industrial Cooperative Awards in Science & Technology (CASE) to start October 2017, and it is only open to citizens of the UK and EU. We regret that we are unable to consider non-UK/non-EU citizens for this project. To determine if you are eligible, please visit:

http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

In addition, students would need to be eligible for 'Home Fees' according to the criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/costs/status.html Full details can be found here: http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/skills/students/help/eligibility/

We are currently recruiting an outstanding PhD candidate for project involving molecular simulations for adsorption processes in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The project is a collaborative research program between the Department of Chemical Engineering & Biotechnology (CEB), University of Cambridge, and Shell.

The project lies at the interface between Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, and focuses in the use of porous MOFs, one of the most exciting developments in recent porous materials science, for gas storage under the activities of Shell. The approach is based in the use of computational methods to understand their stability and to identify the structure-property relations for gas adsorption applications application. The identification of optimal materials will allow then to their characterisation and performance analysis. The principal questions for this project are: How can we predict the performance of these materials using quantum mechanics and classical simulations? How do the different building blocks and topologies of the materials we study influence their adsorption performance? Are these materials stable enough?

The ideal candidate will have a 1st class degree or equivalent in chemical engineering, physics, chemistry or a related scientific discipline, and experience in cross-disciplinary work (if your degree is from outside the UK, please visit: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk//international-students/international-qualifications to determine if your final grade/mark equates to a UK First). Previous experience in computational methods and programming are welcome. This is a multidisciplinary project and the successful candidate will benefit from an extensive peer-group of researchers, as well as acquiring skills in adsorption, porous materials and computational methods that are in high demand in both industry and academia.

The successful candidate will be expected to formally apply for admission as a PhD student and meet any conditions of admission set by the University. More information can be found at: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/

To apply for this position, please send the following to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on Monday 17th April 2017:

1) Include the vacancy reference number, NQ11717, in the subject line of your email 2) A detailed curriculum vitae 3) Transcripts and/or degree certificates that include numerical details of grades obtained in relevant examinations/courses.

Please quote reference NQ11717 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: New Insights into the Rheology of Dense Particulate Systems: Understanding Micro-Scale Transport Phenomena in Industrially- Relevant Wet Particulate Systems using Magnetic Resonance

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

A 3-year fully-funded studentship is available to work with Professor Lynn Gladden and Dr. Andrew Sederman to investigate the properties and processing of high solids content structured liquids, slurries and pastes using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. As well as being a subject of much topical interest across mathematics, physics and chemical engineering, the rheology of dense particulate systems is of wide industrial relevance. In this project the main application of interest is the formulation, processing and characterisation of catalytic materials. The project is funded by Johnson Matthey plc (www.matthey.com), one of the largest catalyst manufacturers in the world.

Of particular relevance in this project will be investigating the movement of the liquid when the system is subject to different physical gradients, i.e. shear, pressure, and temperature. This is of paramount importance for the production of high quality, consistent products. Specific industrially-important applications will include: migration of the water phase in ceramic pastes during extrusion; thin film coating of slurries; drying of wet particulate structures; wetting behaviour of dry powders during the creation of slurry. It is expected that some NMR/MRI technique development will be required to allow investigation of these relatively fast processes.

This 3 year fully-funded PhD research project will employ a wide range of NMR and MRI experimental techniques. The project will involve NMR technique development, as well as experiments on both model and realistic conditions.

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics. The project will start on 1 October 2017.

Informal enquires may be directed to either Dr Andrew Sederman (ajs40@cam.ac.uk) or Dr Andy York (ayork@matthey.com). Please do not send applications to Drs. Sederman or York.

To apply for the studentship:

  1. Include the Vacancy Reference number LFGPHD004A in the subject line of your email.

  2. Send your CV, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations, to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on 19 May 2017.

Please quote reference LFGPHD004A on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Optimising the Surface Chemistry of Catalytic Materials

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Mar 09, 2017.

Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to UK and EU nationals. Students must meet the eligibility criteria at: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/fees/funding/councils/eligibility.html

(4-year fully-funded EPSRC industrial CASE studentship with Professor Lynn Gladden and Dr. Mick Mantle; industrial partner BP plc. Project to start 1 October 2017.)

Heterogeneous catalysis lies at the heart of many catalytic processes, which contribute to an industrial sector worth £50 billion p.a. to the UK economy. During a heterogeneous catalytic processes, one or more of the reactant species must interact with the surface of the catalyst where reaction to products then occurs. The aim of this project is to learn how to modify the surface chemistry of, typically, oxide-based materials to optimise their adsorption properties for specific catalytic conversions. The project will introduce the student to a range of well-established catalyst characterisation techniques. However, the main focus of the project will be to extend our use of NMR nuclear spin relaxation time techniques to characterise molecule-surface interactions and, in particular, to study multi-component adsorption in both the gas and liquid phases. These experiments will be combined with NMR measurements of molecular diffusion, Thus we aim to measure how modifications to surface chemistry change the adsorption and molecular mobility within a catalyst. These methods are of particular interest because they can be performed under reaction conditions making the results of immediate relevance to real catalytic materials, including porous silicas and zeolites.

Applicants for the studentship should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, engineering, chemistry or physics.

To apply for the studentship:

  1. Include the Vacancy Reference number LFGPHD003A in the subject line of your email.

  2. Send your CV, to include grades/marks received in relevant examinations, to recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk by 17:00 on 19 May 2017.

Please quote reference LFGPHD003A on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

PhD UK/EU Studentship: Selective Oxidation Reactions - A Chemical Looping Approach, Combustion Group

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Feb 28, 2017.

A fully funded PhD studentship (EPSRC iCASE award with Johnson Matthey) is available working with Prof. J. S. Dennis (CEB) and Dr S. A. Scott (CUED) on the use of chemical looping for the selective oxidation of organic feedstocks of industrial interest.

Due to funding regulations, this studentship is only available to students who meet the eligibility criteria of the UK Research Councils: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

The principle of utilising regenerable lattice oxygen from a solid carrier akin to a Mars and van Krevelen mechanism is illustrated in Fig. 1 and it is proposed to use this approach to produce valued industrial chemicals through selective oxidation chemistry. The hypothesis of a chemical looping approach to selective oxidations is to render the reaction safer (no direct contact of air or molecular oxygen with a flammable feedstock), more selective (lattice oxygen rather than molecular oxygen) and more intensive (less recycle and more facile product separation with improved selectivity and a nitrogen-free product). The improved safety could also expand the capacity range of the process and the potential of a distributed product. An environmental benefit is a reduction in the (thermodynamically favoured) CO2 emissions and also NOx in some cases. The reactor technologies involved could either be circulating fluidised bed systems comprising of a main reactor and an air regeneration reactor, or an array of parallel fixed-bed units with gas-switching. The questions being asked are whether the envisaged improvements are both observable (and quantifiable) and can these improvements actually be realized in a viable process flowsheet that significantly improves on the existing industrial technology?

A main challenge is the development of a stable redox catalyst, often comprising of supported metal, or mixed-metal oxides e.g. Mn, V, Bi, Ag. This material must be capable of providing a selective catalytic surface as well as exhibiting an appropriate lattice oxygen capacity, whilst undergoing multi-cycle redox at temperature. Literature data will provide some of the formulations to try and some of these will be made and developed further by Cambridge, who have experience in material synthesis for chemical looping projects, with guidance from JM. JM can also provide its own samples to evaluate within this project. The work will focus on two industrially important selective oxidation reactions, namely the ODH of ethane and propane as mentioned and also the epoxidation of ethylene using a supported Ag-based redox catalyst.

The programme will include both an experimental evaluation side, including material development of the redox catalyst, and a process evaluation aspect using simulation tools available at Cambridge e.g. Aspen Plus flowsheet simulator; the latter is deemed important to understand the (implementable) performance benefits and how they affect the process economics, for such novel processes when compared with the current industrial technology. Fixed bed laboratory reactors are available at Cambridge in both Prof. Dennis's group (Dept. Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology) and also Dr. Stuart Scott's (Dept. of Engineering). Characterization equipment e.g. XRD, SEM-EDX, ICP to establish understanding of both the fresh and spent materials is available at both Cambridge and JMTC Sonning.

For information about the Combustion Group please see: http://www.ceb.cam.ac.uk/research/groups/rg-combustion

Applicants should have a First Class (or a high 2:1) degree in a relevant discipline such as chemical engineering, physics, chemistry, or engineering. The successful applicant will be expected to apply formally for admission through the University's Graduate Admissions Office and meet any conditions of admission they set forth.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 4 years in the first instance.

To apply for this studentship: Please email a detailed curriculum vitae (to include numerical details of grades obtained in relevant examinations) to: recruitment@ceb.cam.ac.uk

Applicants should ensure their application is complete and submitted by 5pm on the closing date.

Please quote reference NQ11561- UK/EU Studentship: Combustion Group on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Research Assistant/Associate (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Feb 22, 2017.

A position is open for a Postdoctoral Research Associate/Assistant as part of an EPSRC funded Research Project at the University of Cambridge, in the group of Dr Laura Torrente.

The successful candidate will have a strong background in heterogeneous catalysis, membrane systems and chemical reaction engineering, including a PhD in a relevant area. Basic understanding of electrochemical processes is also desirable.

The post-holder will be part of a multidisciplinary team involving the University of Bath (Prof Frank Marken) and the University of Liverpool (Dr Kate Balck) to produce a step-change technological evolution of the existing PEM fuel cells by switching the anode process to indirect hydrogen. In this context, this project will focus on the development of novel catalytic inks for the production of hydrogen from ammonia-rich streams based on the work carried out in the group. The optimum catalytic system will be engineered to integrate the production and purification of hydrogen in membrane systems for their integration in the existing PEM fuel cell technology.

The ability to work both as part of a team, and independently, coupled with excellent communication, organisational and problem solving skills are required. The duties / responsibilities of this post include developing and driving research objectives, writing up work for presentation and publication, collaborating with industrial partners, assisting in the supervision of student research projects, and delivering seminars and occasional talks as outlined on the Further Information document.

Immediate availability is desirable.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 20 months in the first instance. Applicants should provide a CV, including contact details of three referees and a covering letter describing their suitability for the role.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 20 months in the first instance.

Once an offer of employment has been accepted, the successful candidate will be required to undergo a basic disclosure (criminal records check) check and a health assessment.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

For further information contact Dr Laura Torrente (lt416@cam.ac.uk)

Please quote reference NQ11527 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.