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Prizes and awards 2004

Danckwerts-Pergamon Prize

The Danckwerts-Pergamon Prize is awarded by the Department each year for the best PhD dissertation on a subject connected with Chemical Engineering. The winner is chosen from those students who gained their PhDs in the preceding calendar year.

Miranda Chow is the winner of the Danckwerts-Pergamon Prize for 2003 for her dissertation The effects of natural convection on the mixing of discharges from coastal outfalls. Her supervisor was Dr Silvana Cardoso. Last year, another of Dr Cardoso's students, Mansel Rogerson, won the Danckwerts-Pergamon Prize.

Miranda's work shows how small-scale instabilities may arise at the boundaries of a cloud of pollutant discharged into the ocean. She and her colleagues investigated the convection and mixing driven by such small-scale instabilities. The instabilities may take the form of fingers, as shown in the photograph of a laboratory experiment on the left. The red image on the right shows their theoretical prediction for the concentration field. The results show that such mixing processes can lead to unexpectedly large pollutant concentrations, locally. This may have serious implications for local flora and fauna.

experimental 			image simulated  			image

Miranda also won the IChemE Fluid Mixing Competition in 2002 for her PhD work and she is now working in the chemical industry in Hong Kong and China.


Prizes for first year research students

At the start of their 2nd year of research, research students are asked to give short presentations on their work so far and to prepare a poster.

On 28 October 2004 twelve students gave their presentations and the prize for the best work was shared between Dan Cooney and Alasdair Campbell. They will each receive £75.

Dan Cooney spoke on Using block copolymers to produce nanoporous media. He is supervised by Dr Moggridge and is a member of the Structured Materials Group. Alasdair Campbell spoke on The effects of natural convection on gas-phase combustion. He is supervised by Dr Cardoso and Prof Hayhurst.

photo of Dan and  			Alasdair

photo of Claire and her  			partner

Poster award

Claire Macleod, who graduated from the Department of Chemical Engineering with an MEng in the summer of 2004, has won the Food Processing Faraday Fast Track Poster Award.

It was presented at the FPF (Food Processing Faraday) Event at PERA, Melton Mowbray on Tuesday, 26 October 2004. Her poster was on the topic of spray freezing of droplets of coffee solution and was based on her Part IIB project with Julia McKittrick, supervised by Drs Mike Johns, Ian Wilson and Jason Hindmarsh.

The photograph shows Claire (on the right) and Julia with their poster. Claire is currently working at Nestle in Switzerland and about to go to do a PhD at Newcastle with Dr Adam Harvey


Dr Mike Johns

Dr Mike Johns became a Fellow of St Catherine's College on 1 October 2004.

Mike completed his PhD here in the Department of Chemical Engineering in 1999 and later become a lecturer. His research interests lie in two distinct areas, structure-processing relationships of materials and contaminant hydrology, with a particular focus on the development and use of various magnetic resonance (MR) techniques.


Sugden Award

Drs Markus Kraft and Michael Balthasar have been awarded The Sugden Award for the most significant contribution to combustion research in 2003.

The award was made by the British Section of the Combustion Institute and was presented at the autumn meeting of the Combustion Institute (British Section) on Particles in Flames at Churchill College on 20 September 2004. It is in recognition of their work described in the paper A stochastic approach to calculate the particle size distribution function of soot particles in laminar premixed flames, published in Combustion and Flame, 133 289-298

Dr Kraft is Head of the Computational Modelling Group. Dr Balthasar is now working for Volvo Trucks in Gothenburg (Göteborg), Sweden.

Michael Balthasar and Markus Kraft
Drs Michael Balthasar (on the left) and Markus Kraft.
Photo by Neal Morgan

IChemE Particle Technology Subject Group Prizes

Claire Macleod and Julia McKittrick (IIB 2004) have been awarded an IChemE Particle Technology Subject Group Prize for 2004. Their project was entitled Generating novel microstructures by spray freezing coffee, and they were supervised by Dr Johns, Dr Wilson and Jason Hindmarsh.

Matthew Turnbull has also been awarded a certificate and prize by the IChemE Particle Technology Subject Group. His project was Ethanol synthesis using a novel reactor and he was supervised by Drs David Scott and Bill Paterson.


Gareth Forde

VESKI Fellowship

Gareth Forde has been awarded a VESKI Fellowship (Victorian Endowment for Science, Knowledge and Information) which will enable him to continue research into DNA vaccines. Gareth has just completed work for his PhD, working on Plasmid DNA purification, supervised by Professor Slater and Dr Ghose. In addition to the Fellowship, he has accepted a lectureship at Monash University (Melbourne) starting in October of this year.

The Victorian Endowment for Science, Knowledge, and Innovation (VESKI) initiative is specifically targeted at identifying outstanding expatriate researchers and professionals with a view to attracting them back to Victoria to contribute to the innovative and vibrant environment. Further information may be found at http://www.veski.com.au/


Fox Prize and North Carolina State University Prize

Two prizes have been awarded to students who have just completed Part IIB of the Chemical Engineering course and who will now graduate with an MEng.

The TRC Fox Prize was awarded to Alan Elder. He is staying on at the Department to work with Dr Kaminski towards the PhD degree. The North Carolina State University Prize was awarded to Matthew Turnbull. He is now working for BP.

The Fox Prize is awarded by the Part IIB Examiners of the Chemical Engineering Tripos to the candidate who has shown the greatest distinction in the examination. The North Carolina State University Prize is awarded by the Part IIB Examiners of the Chemical Engineering Tripos to the candidate who has shown distinction in the performance of original project work in the form of theoretical or experimental investigation.


Pilkington Teaching Prize

photo of Geoff giving Frank Morton lecture Dr Geoff Moggridge has been awarded one of this year's Pilkington Teaching prizes in recognition of excellence in teaching at the University.

The prizes were initiated by the late Sir Alistair Pilkington, Chairman of the Cambridge Foundation, and are awarded annually. Each academic school nominates one member of academic or academic-related staff who has distinguished themselves in teaching. The award ceremony will be held on 8 July 2004.

The photograph shows Geoff giving the 2nd Frank Morton Memorial Lecture at Birmingham University on Monday 8 March 2004. The event attracted the interest of seasoned chemical engineers and school pupils alike and was described as a stimulating look at product design using examples as diverse as chocolate, cheese, heat packs and some tricky little characters known as zebra mussels.


photo of winning  			team
Left to right: Eric Candy, Sarah Smith, Sim Cheah, Peter Hempsall, Anouska Bachraz, Alice Piggott, Alan Stanford.

Design Project: prize for best presentation

The Design Project is a major part of the coursework for Chemical Engineering students in their third year at Cambridge. The project involves the conceptual and process design of a whole plant and in 2004 the students designed a plant to hydrotreat a mixture of gas oil and light cycle oil to reduce its sulphur content.

The project was performed in groups of five or six, and included all the important aspects of Chemical Engineering design: process flowsheet development, equipment sizing, control, economics, safety, environmental considerations and reporting/communication.

The project reports were handed in on 3 June 2004, and then on 4 June, all the groups presented their work as though they were consultants selling their designs to a client.

The prize for best presentation went to Group A. They are pictured here with the Judges from the IChemE, Eric Candy and Alan Stanford.


IChemE Design Prize

In the Lent term of 2004, the IChemE Design Prize was presented for the best Design Project of the year before. In that year, the students designed a bio-diesel plant.

Group F from 2003 has won this year's IChemE prize for the best economics section of a design project.

They are, from left to right in the photo, Jeanette King, Jonathan Griffith, Gillian Hutton, Alan Elder and Tina Morrell.

The prize money is £400 and Design Project organiser Bob Skelton will share it out across the group.

group photo

Research project prize winners

Research projects are a major part of the coursework for Chemical Engineering students in their fourth year at Cambridge, leading to the MEng degree. On 1 March 2004, half of the class gave their presentations with the other half presenting on 8 March.

The prize winners at the research presentations on 1 March 2004 were:

1st place: Mark Sankey and Jonathan Griffith for their project Studying structures in turbulent flows supervised by Prof Gladden, Dr Sederman, Dr Mantle and Mark Sains. Mark and Jonathan will receive a cash prize and a trip to Unilever.
photo of Mark and John

Runners up were Julia McKittrick and Claire Macleod for their project Generating novel microstructures by spray freezing coffee, supervised by Dr Johns, Dr Wilson and Jason Hindmarsh.
photo of Julia and  			Claire

The prize winners at the research presentations on 8 March 2004 were:

1st place: Chris Handscomb for his project Modelling the mean reaction rate in turbulent reactive flow supervised by Dr Markus Kraft. Chris will receive a cash prize and a trip to Unilever.
photo of Chris

Runners up were Jeannette King and Christina Morrell for their project Periodic precipitation for membrane design, supervised by Dr Cardoso and Dr Moggridge
photo of Jeannette and  			Christina


Alan Elder awarded Salters' prize for 2004

Alan Elder Alan Elder has been awarded one of this year's Graduate prizes from The Salters' Institute of Industrial Chemistry.

Each year, the Salters' Institute invites every UK department of Chemistry or Chemical Engineering to nominate one final year undergraduate. The selectors are looking for candidates who will ultimately be able to occupy leading positions in the UK Chemical Industry.

Alan Elder is currently in Part IIB of his Chemical Engineering MEng course and he is working on a research project, "Bio-responsive polymers for cancer diagnostics", supervised by Dr Kaminski and Prof Slater. Next year, he hopes to return to the department to study for a PHD.

By winning this prestigious award, he follows in the footsteps of many previous students from the Department of Chemical Engineering, Cambridge University. Alasdair Campbell won a Salters' prize in 2003, Graham Brook in 2002, Stuart Scott in 2001, Rachel Cooke in 2000, Hamish McPherson in 1999, David Steele in 1998, Lucy Carr in 1997 and Steve Wright in 1996.

The Salters' Institute of Industrial Chemistry aims to support chemistry teaching and to encourage young people to pursue careers in the UK chemical industries.


Prizes for first year research students

At the start of their 2nd year of research, research students are asked to give short presentations on their work so far and to prepare a poster.

On 21 January 2004 eleven students gave their presentations and the prize for the best work was given to Iain Burns for Combustion Thermometry. He is supervised by Dr Clemens Kaminski. The runner up was Belinda Akpa for Applications of Multi-Nuclear NMR in Chemical Engineering. She is supervised by Professor Lynn Gladden and is taking the PhD with Advanced Chemical Engineering Practice.

Belinda and Iain

Matthew  Lim
Matthew Lim (on the right) receiving the Rolls Royce Award in Engineering Science from Dr David Clarke, Rolls Royce, at the House of Commons in 2004 Photo by Frank Dumbleton

Rolls Royce Award in Engineering Science

Matthew Lim has been awarded the Rolls Royce Award in Engineering Science for his work entitled Insights into Traditional Engineering Assumptions using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

The award was presented at the House of Commons at an event held by SET (Science Engineering and Technology) for Britain - Younger Engineers Competition. There were 170 entries and 105 of these were selected to be presented in the House of Commons. There was a medal awarded as the top prize with an award of £5k and four section prizes of £1k each. Matthew won the Engineering Science section prize. There were also five commendation prizes of £500 each.

Other members of the department also attended this event. Sara Gashi presented a poster on Combustion Control: new concepts for environmentally friendly aero engines. Raino Hansen presented his work on the preservation of virus based therapeutics and Sid Ghose on plasmid purification.

The photo shows Matthew Lim (on the right) receiving the prize from Dr David Clarke, Head of Technology Strategy and Research, Rolls Royce.

Photo by Frank Dumbleton