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Business Modules

The business management elements of the programme provide a foundation in the management of technology and innovation, illustrated with examples from the extremes of working in a large corporate environment to setting up a new enterprise. Also addressed are intellectual property rights, patenting, professional codes of practice and the establishment of appropriate economic, legal and social frameworks, which are key issues to consider during the development of new bioscience products.

Healthcare Economics         Law and Intellectual Property         Management of Technology and Innovation

Healthcare Economics

The economic pressures within the healthcare sector are intense and ensuring a balance between the drivers of cost effectiveness, profit and patient satisfaction seems at times unachievable. Providers are increasingly focusing on ways to curb drug budgets, whilst striving to maintain the delivery of effective healthcare. Pharmaceutical companies require a return on investment from current and future drugs, to compensate for the high cost of product development and relatively short patent life. Patients are better informed than at any time in the past and with their role as purchasers increasing and the use of cost-sharing and consumer-driven health plans gaining momentum, traditional marketing tools are no longer enough. Students learn that the life sciences sector must prepare for a future with a new customer focus, where consumer funds are split between a host of other priorities including competing brands, generics, OTC products and non-healthcare goods and services.

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Law and Intellectual Property

Providing an overview of IP rights and patenting processes at a global level, the module illustrates the options that are available to protect new ideas, concepts, written material, images or designs, how the processes work and how to value and exploit the outcome. Corporate governance, the rights of directors and shareholders, contract law, competition policy and other aspects of business law will be discussed. The module also includes work on technology transfer, from academia to industry and from industry to industry and builds on the concept of partnering, joint ventures and mergers acquisitions, introduced in earlier modules, as strategies to overcome commercial development hurdles.

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Management of Technology & Innovation (MoTI)

The MoTI course delivers a range of management ideas and concepts for innovative and technology-intensive businesses. Entrepreneurship, financing, leadership, brand identity and product placement are all vital considerations in any venture.  Entrepreneurship, financing, leadership, brand identity and product placement are all vital considerations in any venture. The business management elements of the programme provide a foundation in technology management and address some of the challenges of setting up new enterprises. The key issues in management, strategy and marketing, accounting and finance are covered, as is the development of new bioscience products, incorporating intellectual property rights, patenting, professional codes of practice and the establishment of appropriate economic, legal and social frameworks.

Teaching is delivered by faculty of Judge Business School, supplemented by guest speakers. The course is shared by other professional practise MPhil programmes and therefore presents a unique opportunity for students to mix with graduates from other disciplines. The selection of course offered under the auspices of the MOTi programme varies from year to year. The following are representative of the subjects offered:

MOTI Courses 

Decision Analysis

Based on one of the leading climate change policy models, the course introduces students to methods and application of decision-making, including environmental economics, cost-benefit analysis and probabilistic modelling.

Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurial case students are discussed from two very distinct perspectives:  that of the individual and their personal role as an entrepreneur and that of the entrepreneurial opportunity or business idea that they intend to bring to commercial fruition. The elements of very practical business know-how will be combined with the more individual and personal behaviours, qualities and skills of successful entrepreneurship.

Finance

Designed to provide a non-specialist with an introductory understanding of the role of finance and accounting in business organization. The course offers a brief introduction to the structure and content of financial statements, to some of the principles of corporate finance and investment appraisal, and to the basics of corporate valuation.

Microeconomics

The purpose of this course of lectures is to provide students with an introduction to microeconomics and to familiarise them with some basic concepts, tools and models relevant to management and business in general and, where possible, the management of technology and innovation in particular. Topics covered include some basic price theory, the firm, market structure, game theory, transactions costs, market power and externalities.

Technology Strategy

Technology is a key driver of change in several increasingly inter-connected industries. Basic concepts in strategy are utilised to demonstrates how firms seek to build their competitive advantage on technology. Focus rests in particular on the dynamics of technological evolution and competition in the New Economy, and provides an understanding of  how some firms are able to develop sustainable competitive advantages based on their technologies, while other, equally innovative firms fail to capitalize on their innovations. 

MoTI Consultancy Project

In addition to the taught MoTI components, students work in teams under the supervision by a faculty member on a real company consultancy problem. Students gain first-hand experience of the reality of innovation, project management and entrepreneurship and develop analytical skills in a real-world context. In addition to providing an opportunity to apply tools and concepts learned from the taught component of MoTI, this practical dimension affords students the opportunity to work in multidisciplinary teams and to build a network of contacts within the Cambridge technology community. 

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