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Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology

 

The Design Project for 2006 was to convert natural gas to liquid hydrocarbons using the Fischer-Tropsch process. In particular it was desired to produce naphtha (gasoline) and middle distillates (diesel) that could be sold as transport fuel.

The project reports were handed in on 8 June 2006 and the presentations were given on the afternoon of Friday, 9 June. It was a very hot day.

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Group D Shaman GTL. Alexander Johnstone, Jennifer Neilson, Sandy Kwok, Alwin Fung, Jonathan Harrison
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Group G. Laurence McGlashan, Vicki Graham, Camilla Pepper, Mimi Tan, Jeremy Gummow
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Group F Hau Technologies. Chirag Parmar, Irina Reder, Ian Elder, James Glover, Andrew Martin
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Group E Team Girl
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Matthew Ives, Bai Song, Emma Gilroy, Jisun Lee, Sarah Palit
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Group C TT. Seigo Robinson, Adam Khanbhai, Jonathon Murray, Richard Mundy, Richard Hammond
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Group B 710 AD. Chester Tan, Clara Fan, Xuan Han, David Walker, David Holmes
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and Andrew Jones
David Clara Chester Xuan Andrew David = DCCX AD = 710 AD
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Group A for ACE. Kate Hindson, Aseer Akhter, Sean Tully, Yioda Pieri, Charles Mong, Gentiana Shiko
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The old fashioned way...
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Prof Nigel Slater
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The party, in the Shell Social Room, which was just as hot as the lecture theatre
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Alan Stanford from IChemE congratulated everyone on the standard of their presentations
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and the winner was Group E, Team Girl, Bai Song, Sarah Palit, Emma Gilroy Jisun Lee and Matthew Ives.
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