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Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology

 

Morning

Arrive at 10.30am for tea, coffee and light refreshments plus the chance to meet friends.
The event will start at 11am and the following talks are planned:

  • Review of the foundation and early years of the Department: Professor John Davidson (Head of Department 1975-93)
  • Changes the Department is planning: Professor Lynn Gladden (Head of Department)
  • The Changing Environment in the 1990s: Professor John Bridgwater (Head of Department 1993-98)
  • Teaching at the Department, past and present: Dr Patrick Barrie.
  • Future challenges for chemical engineers from an industrial perspective: Dr William Banholzer (Corporate Vice President and Chief Technical Officer of Dow Chemicals)

Lunch

Buffet lunch in the Department on Pembroke Street - there will be tours and poster displays and time to talk to current students about their work.

Afternoon

In the afternoon some of our current researchers will share their visions for the future and talk about new developments in their fields. The talks are as follows:

  • Multi-scale sustainable reaction engineering: Dr John Dennis
  • Computational modelling in chemical engineering - From science to technology: Dr Markus Kraft
  • Measurements in modern chemical engineering: from molecules to products: Dr Clemens Kaminski
  • The interface between chemical engineering and biotechnology: Professors Howard Chase, Chris Lowe and Nigel Slater
  • The University's position on our merger and planned new building: Professor Ian Leslie

After the day event you can opt to visit the West Cambridge site where we hope to have a department building in future. The tour will take in the Magnetic Resonance Research Centre which is on the West Cambridge site.

Evening

Dinner will be in the Hall at Trinity College and there will be drinks before and after the meal in The Cloisters.

Latest news

A new world (dis)order for efficient semiconductors

11 November 2019

Scientists from our Optoelectronic Materials and Device Spectroscopy group investigating perovskite materials for next generation solar cells and flexible LEDs have discovered that they can be more efficient when their chemical compositions are less ordered, vastly simplifying production processes and lowering cost.

The topology of disordered 3D graphenes: Rosalind Franklin’s pre-DNA problem untangled

8 November 2019

Researchers from our Computational Modelling group have published a possible solution to why disordered carbon structures are reluctant to turn into graphite, a puzzle that perplexed Rosalind Franklin before her discovery of the structure of DNA.

September paper of the month: flexible production of micro and nanofluidic devices

22 October 2019

Researchers from our Laser Analytics group have developed a laser-based manufacturing process that can produce combined nanofluidic and microfluidic devices in a fast and scalable manner.