skip to content

Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology

 

Research Associate (Fixed Term)

Research vacancies - Fri, 10/05/2024 - 00:00

Applications are invited for a Postdoctoral Research Associate (PDRA) to work on computational modelling of prosthetic heart valves with Dr Shelly Singh-Gryzbon in the department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology at the University of Cambridge. Funding is available for a 1 year fixed-termed post in the first instance.

The aim of the project is to develop and validate computational models and simulations for assessing clinical outcomes of aortic valve replacement procedures. Research will be focused on valve thrombosis, coronary obstruction, and structural implications of valve-in-valve procedures.

Necessary qualifications include a PhD in a relevant subject area. Candidates must demonstrate experience in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), finite element analysis (FEA), and/or fluid-structure interactions (FSI) for problems involving large deformations. Experience with experimental fluid and structural mechanics or medical device design would also be an advantage.

Key responsibilities include developing and validation computational models and simulations, exercising independent responsibility for project development of research outcomes, writing up work for presentation and publication, collaborating with academic, clinical and industrial partners, assisting in the supervision of student research projects, and mentoring graduate students.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 12 months in the first instance.

Click the 'Apply' button below to register an account with our recruitment system (if you have not already) and apply online.

Informal enquiries are welcomed and should be directed to Mr Vito Candela, HR Administrator, at hr@ceb.cam.ac.uk.

Applications closing dates 30th June 2024

Please quote reference NQ41631 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University actively supports equality, diversity and inclusion and encourages applications from all sections of society.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Research Associate (Fixed Term)

All current vacancies and studentships - Fri, 10/05/2024 - 00:00

Applications are invited for a Postdoctoral Research Associate (PDRA) to work on computational modelling of prosthetic heart valves with Dr Shelly Singh-Gryzbon in the department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology at the University of Cambridge. Funding is available for a 1 year fixed-termed post in the first instance.

The aim of the project is to develop and validate computational models and simulations for assessing clinical outcomes of aortic valve replacement procedures. Research will be focused on valve thrombosis, coronary obstruction, and structural implications of valve-in-valve procedures.

Necessary qualifications include a PhD in a relevant subject area. Candidates must demonstrate experience in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), finite element analysis (FEA), and/or fluid-structure interactions (FSI) for problems involving large deformations. Experience with experimental fluid and structural mechanics or medical device design would also be an advantage.

Key responsibilities include developing and validation computational models and simulations, exercising independent responsibility for project development of research outcomes, writing up work for presentation and publication, collaborating with academic, clinical and industrial partners, assisting in the supervision of student research projects, and mentoring graduate students.

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for 12 months in the first instance.

Click the 'Apply' button below to register an account with our recruitment system (if you have not already) and apply online.

Informal enquiries are welcomed and should be directed to Mr Vito Candela, HR Administrator, at hr@ceb.cam.ac.uk.

Applications closing dates 30th June 2024

Please quote reference NQ41631 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University actively supports equality, diversity and inclusion and encourages applications from all sections of society.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Enhancing Drug Delivery Efficacy Through Bilayer Coating of Zirconium-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks: Sustained Release and Improved Chemical Stability and Cellular Uptake for Cancer Therapy

Pubmed - Mon, 29/04/2024 - 11:00

Chem Mater. 2024 Apr 11;36(8):3588-3603. doi: 10.1021/acs.chemmater.3c02954. eCollection 2024 Apr 23.

ABSTRACT

The development of nanoparticle (NP)-based drug carriers has presented an exciting opportunity to address challenges in oncology. Among the 100,000 available possibilities, zirconium-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as promising candidates in biomedical applications. Zr-MOFs can be easily synthesized as small-size NPs compatible with intravenous injection, whereas the ease of decorating their external surfaces with functional groups allows for targeted treatment. Despite these benefits, Zr-MOFs suffer degradation and aggregation in real, in vivo conditions, whereas the loaded drugs will suffer the burst effect-i.e., the fast release of drugs in less than 48 h. To tackle these issues, we developed a simple but effective bilayer coating strategy in a generic, two-step process. In this work, bilayer-coated MOF NU-901 remained well dispersed in biologically relevant fluids such as buffers and cell growth media. Additionally, the coating enhances the long-term stability of drug-loaded MOFs in water by simultaneously preventing sustained leakage of the drug and aggregation of the MOF particles. We evaluated our materials for the encapsulation and transport of pemetrexed, the standard-of-care chemotherapy in mesothelioma. The bilayer coating allowed for a slowed release of pemetrexed over 7 days, superior to the typical 48 h release found in bare MOFs. This slow release and the related performance were studied in vitro using both A549 lung cancer and 3T mesothelioma cells. Using high-resolution microscopy, we found the successful uptake of bilayer-coated MOFs by the cells with an accumulation in the lysosomes. The pemetrex-loaded NU-901 was indeed cytotoxic to 3T and A549 cancer cells. Finally, we demonstrated the general approach by extending the coating strategy using two additional lipids and four surfactants. This research highlights how a simple yet effective bilayer coating provides new insights into the design of promising MOF-based drug delivery systems.

PMID:38681089 | PMC:PMC11044268 | DOI:10.1021/acs.chemmater.3c02954

Remanufacturing Perovskite Solar Cells and Modules-A Holistic Case Study

Pubmed - Wed, 03/04/2024 - 11:00

ACS Sustain Resour Manag. 2024 Jan 31;1(3):417-426. doi: 10.1021/acssusresmgt.3c00042. eCollection 2024 Mar 28.

ABSTRACT

While perovskite photovoltaic (PV) devices are on the verge of commercialization, promising methods to recycle or remanufacture fully encapsulated perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and modules are still missing. Through a detailed life-cycle assessment shown in this work, we identify that the majority of the greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced by re-using the glass substrate and parts of the PV cells. Based on these analytical findings, we develop a novel thermally assisted mechanochemical approach to remove the encapsulants, the electrode, and the perovskite absorber, allowing reuse of most of the device constituents for remanufacturing PSCs, which recovered nearly 90% of their initial performance. Notably, this is the first experimental demonstration of remanufacturing PSCs with an encapsulant and an edge-seal, which are necessary for commercial perovskite solar modules. This approach distinguishes itself from the "traditional" recycling methods previously demonstrated in perovskite literature by allowing direct reuse of bulk materials with high environmental impact. Thus, such a remanufacturing strategy becomes even more favorable than recycling, and it allows us to save up to 33% of the module's global warming potential. Remarkably, this process most likely can be universally applied to other PSC architectures, particularly n-i-p-based architectures that rely on inorganic metal oxide layers deposited on glass substrates. Finally, we demonstrate that the CO2-footprint of these remanufactured devices can become less than 30 g/kWh, which is the value for state-of-the-art c-Si PV modules, and can even reach 15 g/kWh assuming a similar lifetime.

PMID:38566747 | PMC:PMC10983827 | DOI:10.1021/acssusresmgt.3c00042

Indole-containing pharmaceuticals: targets, pharmacological activities, and SAR studies

Pubmed - Fri, 22/03/2024 - 10:00

RSC Med Chem. 2024 Jan 30;15(3):788-808. doi: 10.1039/d3md00677h. eCollection 2024 Mar 20.

ABSTRACT

Indole is a prestigious heterocyclic skeleton widely found in both naturally-occurring and biologically-active compounds. Pharmaceutical agents containing an indole skeleton in their framework possess a wide range of pharmacological properties, including antiviral, antitumor, analgesic, and other therapeutic activities, and many indole-containing drugs have been proven to have excellent pharmacokinetic and pharmacological effects. Over the past few decades, the FDA has approved over 40 indole-containing drugs for the treatment of various clinical conditions, and the development of indole-related drugs has attracted significant attention from medicinal chemists. This review aims to provide an overview of all the approved drugs that contain an indole nucleus, focusing on their targets, pharmacological activities, and SAR studies.

PMID:38516587 | PMC:PMC10953485 | DOI:10.1039/d3md00677h

High-performance bifacial perovskite solar cells enabled by single-walled carbon nanotubes

Pubmed - Wed, 13/03/2024 - 10:00

Nat Commun. 2024 Mar 12;15(1):2245. doi: 10.1038/s41467-024-46620-1.

ABSTRACT

Bifacial perovskite solar cells have shown great promise for increasing power output by capturing light from both sides. However, the suboptimal optical transmittance of back metal electrodes together with the complex fabrication process associated with front transparent conducting oxides have hindered the development of efficient bifacial PSCs. Here, we present a novel approach for bifacial perovskite devices using single-walled carbon nanotubes as both front and back electrodes. single-walled carbon nanotubes offer high transparency, conductivity, and stability, enabling bifacial PSCs with a bifaciality factor of over 98% and a power generation density of over 36%. We also fabricate flexible, all-carbon-electrode-based devices with a high power-per-weight value of 73.75 W g-1 and excellent mechanical durability. Furthermore, we show that our bifacial devices have a much lower material cost than conventional monofacial PSCs. Our work demonstrates the potential of SWCNT electrodes for efficient, stable, and low-cost bifacial perovskite photovoltaics.

PMID:38472279 | PMC:PMC10933432 | DOI:10.1038/s41467-024-46620-1